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Portuguese caldo verde with cauliflower & kale

Today will be the 4th time I’ve made this soup since Fall arrived. Can’t get enough of it!! It’s incredibly flavorful and guilt free at 380 calories per serving.

Sometimes I puree it completely and sometimes I leave some cauliflower bits in the soup. It’s perfect either way. The vinegar on top should not be skipped :).

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 pounds cauliflower (from 1 large head)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1.5  teaspoons smoked paprika
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (plus extra for roasting)
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 8 cups chicken stock
  • 14 ounces smoked turkey kielbasa (or any smoked sausage – 1 package), sliced into rounds
  • 3/4 bag Trader Joe’s Tuscan Kale shredded
  • 1/4 cup cilantro, finely chopped
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • Sherry Vinegar, for drizzling

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 450 F. Slice the cauliflower into large slices and spread in a single layer on a baking sheet. Season cauliflower with cumin, smoked paprika, and liberal amounts of salt, pepper, and olive oil. Roast in the oven for 30 minutes. Set aside once cooked.

Sauté the onion in 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-medium high heat until tender and translucent and beginning to brown. Add garlic and pepper flakes and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add cauliflower and stock and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer about an hour. Remove from heat and purée.

In a skillet, brown sliced kielbasa and set aside.

Return the puréed soup to low heat. Add the kale and sausage and simmer another 10 – 15 minutes until the greens soften a bit. Remove from heat. Stir in the cilantro and the lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve with a sprinkle of smoked paprika,  drizzle of olive oil & splash of sherry vinegar (optional).

Butternut squash, short ribs & black bean chili

This experiment turned out WAY better than I thought it would. The complex flavors from the cocoa powder and ancho chili powder are a perfect balance with the rich short ribs. The nutty butternut squash is a winner to balance the heat.It makes a ton so call some friends!

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3 pounds short ribs, bone in
  • 1 leek, cleaned and cut into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 T ancho chili powder
  • 1 T unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ T cumin
  • 1 can Rotel (I used hot with habanero)
  • 1 28 ounce can whole peeled tomatoes (pulverized with your fingers)
  • 6 cups beef broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 cups butternut squash, peeled and cubed into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 2 14 ounce cans black beans, drained and rinsed

DIRECTIONS

Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season beef with salt & pepper and add to pan. Cook about 8-10 minutes, browning on all sides. Remove from pan and set aside.

Add onion and leeks and cook another 8-10 minutes, until onions are soft and translucent. Add the garlic, chili powder, cocoa, and cumin and cook another 2 minutes, stirring constantly.

Add the rotel, tomatoes, beef broth & water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and cover. Simmer for 1 hour.

Add butternut squash and simmer for another hour, until beef and squash are tender. Remove the ribs from the pot & shred the meat. Discard the bones. Add the shredded meat back to the pot with the black beans and cook for 15 more minutes.

Serve with cornbread & garnish with cilantro!

Tuscan Bean Soup with Chicken, Sausage & Kale

I’m always inspired by food when I travel and Tuscany has been my focus since I’ve been home. This soup is my combination of 2 memorable dishes in Tuscany… Dario’s beans & a bowl of ribollita for lunch on the street in Florence.

Dinner with Dario Cecchini in Panzano was the most memorable experience. He’s impressive being an 8th generation butcher with a big personality. His restaurants are fun & they are an experience… not just a meal. Surprisingly it wasn’t the 5 courses of meat I couldn’t forget … it was the beans! Here’s how it starts:

– Small bowl with some Tuscan salt & herbs (his blend**)
– Generous drizzle of olive oil
– Splash of red wine vinegar

This is the dipping vehicle for your carrots & raw vegetables. Then you find the bowl of bread and decide what the hell – dip it! Just when you think your bowl can do no more… a big ladle of white beans & broth are ladled into the remaining oil/vinegar/salt bowl.

Divine. That’s all the inspiration I need!

Buon appetito!

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 stalks celery – diced
  • 4 carrots – peeled & diced
  • 2 leeks – cleaned, rinsed and cut into ½ moons
  • ½ yellow onion – diced
  • 3 cloves garlic – minced
  • ¼ tsp crushed red pepper
  • 1 pound sweet Italian sausage – natural sausage casing removed
  • 4 chicken thighs – skin-on & bone-in
  • 1 cup Pinot Grigio wine
  • 8 -10 cups chicken broth
  • 1 bag Tuscan kale – washed
  • 2 cans cannellini beans – rinsed
  • 3 T red wine vinegar
  • salt & pepper

DIRECTIONS

Remove the sausage from DCW Casing and tear it by hand into bite-size pieces. Heat 1 Tbs. of the olive oil in a 4- or 5-quart heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the sausage and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer the sausage to a plate, leaving any rendered fat in the pot.

In the same pot, add the chicken thighs and sear until brown on all sides. Transfer to the same plate as the sausage. Set aside for later.

Add 1 Tbs. olive oil to the pot, increase the heat to medium high, and add the onion, celery, carrot, leeks, onion, crushed red pepper and garlic . Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste. Cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant and beginning to soften, about 3-4 minutes. Be sure to scrape any brown bits from the bottom of the pan.

Add the white wine and cook for 2-3 minutes. Add the chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat.

When the broth reaches a boil, reduce the heat to medium and add the sausage & chicken along with any collected juices. Cook for 30 minutes.

Remove the chicken and pull the meat from the bone. Discard the skin & bones. Add the chicken meat back to the pot with the drained & rinsed beans.

Stir in the kale, adjust the heat as necessary to maintain a gentle simmer, and simmer until the kale is tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper & add the vinegar.

Serve with a drizzle of olive oil & a splash of red wine vinegar. Crusty bread is a must!

Ancho Turkey Chili

There are a few kitchen gadgets that I do not own… it’s a shock to me too. I see TV chefs putting all kinds of fun things through a food mill and magically there is a beautiful fresh tomato puree with no skin or seeds – can’t I make that happen with a food processor and sieve? The ricer is another contraption I could use to turn out some light and beautiful mashed potatoes – but I don’t really like mashed potatoes.

Soups and sauces are more my thing and there have been many blender blow-ups of hot bisque all over my kitchen. It’s time for an immersion blender – that is a gadget I will use and won’t take up a ton of space. On Christmas Day I opened the box and instantly put it to use for my pork roast pan sauce. I noticed my Dad eyeing the “boat motor” he spent hours shopping for (thanks mom) and his brain was ticking. He’s quite a good cook and has been experimenting with dried chiles for chili and soups… this would be a perfect way to get those chilies pureed.

Since I have been looking for anything to puree lately – I decided to give his method a shot in my healthy turkey chili. I’m a changed person. Really I am. The intensity you get from the dried chili puree can’t be achieved with chili powder alone. The combination of both with the fresh toasted spices is a crazy ride on the flavor boat.

I love this gadget and round 2 with poblanos & chicken is coming soon!

Cooks Notes: You can use a blender to puree the chilis – be sure to push through a sieve to remove any pepper skins. If you don’t have whole spices – use the same measurement of ground spices.

Ancho Turkey Chili

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 to 5 medium dried ancho chiles, stemmed and seeded
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 large cloves garlic, smashed, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds ground turkey (85/15)
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 4 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons whole cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 cups low-salt chicken broth
  • One 15 to 16-ounce can beans – black pinto kidney mix, rinsed and drained

DIRECTIONS

Make Ancho Puree: Place chiles in medium bowl. Pour enough boiling water over to cover. Soak until chiles soften, at least 30 minutes and up to 4 hours. Puree in a blender or with an immersion blender. Strain through a fine mesh sieve to eliminate any of the skins.

Toast the spices: In a small, dry skillet, toast the seeds over medium-high heat, shaking the pan often. Keep watch to ensure the seeds don’t burn. When the seeds are fragrant and slightly darker, transfer them to a plate. Cool the toasted seeds, then grind them in a spice mill.

Heat the oil in a heavy, large pot over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and onions. Saute until the vegetables soften, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the turkey and saute until no longer pink, breaking up the turkey with the back of a spoon, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over and stir to blend. Add the chili puree, tomato paste, chili powder, cumin, coriander, sugar, oregano, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Cook 1 to 2 minutes, stirring to blend. Add the broth and beans. Bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the flavors blend and the chili thickens to desired consistency, stirring often, 20 to 30 minutes. Season with more salt and pepper to taste.

Serve with cilantro, cheese & sour cream.

 

Cioppino

Cioppino is a fish stew originating from Portuguese and Italian fishermen who settled in the North Beach section of San Francisco in the late 1800’s. It’s a collective pot of leftover catch of the day from the local fisherman. The story is that wharf cooks would call for the fishermen to “chip in” some of their catch to the collective soup pot. Typically a combination of dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish were thrown into the tomato and wine broth.

Use whatever fish and seafood combination you like. Shrimp, scallops, halibut and mussels are my favorites and what I chose.

A few tips.

  • Infusing the stock with the shrimp shells imparts a lot of flavor – so do the extra work and peel & devein your own shrimp just for the shells.
  • Pernod (anise flavored liquor) is a classic flavor in Cioppino. If you don’t have any (or don’t want to spend the money on a bottle) – chop a bulb of fennel and add to the onions when cooking.
  • Fish Stock – so maybe you can’t find fish stock in your store. If not, use equal parts of bottled clam juice & water.

INGREDIENTS

  • 32 ounces (2 quarts) fish stock, Kitchen Basics is my favorite
  • Pinch saffron
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, or as needed
  • 5 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole plum tomatoes, crushed by hand (or pureed in food processor)
  • 2 cups white wine (Pinot Grigio)
  • 1/4 cup pernod
  • ¼ cup pesto
  • ½ cup parsley, chopped
  • 1 pounds mussels
  • 1 pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined (reserve shells)
  • 3/4 pound sea scallops, foot removed
  • 2 pounds halibut fillet, skinned, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • ½ cup basil, chopped
  • 1 loaf crusty bread

DIRECTIONS

Heat fish stock in a small saucepan. Add reserved shrimp shells to fish stock and simmer for 5 minutes. Strain stock of shrimp shells into large bowl. Add saffron to warm stock and set aside.

Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in an 8-quart pot over medium-high heat. Add garlic, allowing it to brown for about 20 seconds, then add onions and a pinch of salt. Cook until onions are softened, about 4 minutes. Add bay leaf and oregano. Stir and cook for 30 seconds. Add tomato paste. Cook, stirring, until paste darkens a bit, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add tomatoes white wine, pernod and the saffron flavored fish stock and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper. Cook until liquid has reduced by half. Cover pan and simmer for 30 minutes.

Stir in the pesto and parsley. Add mussels and simmer until mussels open, about 3 minutes (discard any unopened clams). Add shrimp and scallops and cook for about 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, season halibut salt and pepper. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons oil. Cook the halibut until seared and the fish is cooked through – about 2-3 minutes per side.

Remove bay leaf from pot. Season with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowl and top with chopped basil. Serve with crusty bread.

Lentil Soup with Sausage, Beans and Spinach

The leftover Christmas ham bone HAD to be used… and not in the traditional black-eyed pea pot that I’ve never wanted to eat on New Years Day. So why not start a new tradition with a pot of lentils and cornbread instead?

Lentils are a high fiber super legume. They have excellent amounts of six important minerals, two B-vitamins and protein. Did I mention all of the above is also fat free? Nothing guilty about eating this soup. I prefer the French green ones – they hold their shape and aren’t overly mushy.

Do not skip the balsamic vinegar… it’s the secret ingredient.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 5 carrots peeled and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 4 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 large tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup French green lentils
  • 1 small can whole tomatoes, crushed by hand
  • 1 ham bone or ham hock
  • 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 8 cups chicken stock
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1 can cannellini beans
  • 1/2 package frozen spinach, squeezed dry
  • 1/2 lemon juiced
  • 1 turkey kielbasa
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Parmesan cheese, grated

DIRECTIONS

Heat oil in large soup pot. Add garlic, carrots, celery, shallots, onions and cook until soft about 5 to 7 minutes. Season with salt & pepper. Stir in tomato paste and crushed red pepper. Cook 2 minutes to brown the paste. Stir in lentils, tomatoes, ham bone, oregano, basil and bay leaf. Add chicken broth then cover and simmer for 30 minutes.

Add balsamic vinegar, cannellini beans, spinach, lemon juice and sausage. Stir contents of pot then cover again and simmer, 15-20 minutes longer, or until lentils are soft. Remove and discard bay leaf and ham bone. Taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper if needed. Ladle into bowls and garnish with drizzles of oil and freshly grated parmesan cheese.

Roasted Vegetable Soup

New Years Eve a few years back I decided to have a small get together. I had big platters of roasted vegetables and red pepper dip to spread on baguettes. The next day I threw the leftovers into a pot and made soup. It was fantastic and has been added to the “keepers” pile.

Roasting any vegetable brings out the sweetness and richness of a vegetable and is my favorite method for cooking vegetables (try brussel sprouts!). This soup is a pot full of health (yes, even with the bacon and cream). Vegetarian, low fat, low calorie, tons of vitamins (see nutrition info below). Most importantly it is very satisfying and flavorful. I like to top mine with a little sour cream or shredded parmesan (or both).

For you eaters who want the meat‚ add some kielbasa.

Nutrition Information (Serving Size 1.5 cups): Calories: 134, Fat: 6.8g, Carb: 15g, Sugars: 5g, Protein: 5g

INGREDIENTS

  • Bacon, 2 slices cut into lardons
  • Yellow Onion, 1 medium diced
  • Olive Oil
  • Cauliflower, 1 head chopped into large pieces
  • Broccoli, 1 bag or 2 heads cut into florets
  • Baby carrots, small bag
  • Zucchini, 3 sliced lengthwise
  • Cherry tomatoes, 1 pint
  • Roasted garlic, 3 cloves
  • Tomato Paste, 6 tablespoons
  • Chicken Stock, 6 cups
  • Bay leaves, 3 whole
  • Thyme, 4 sprigs or 1 teaspoon dried
  • Half and Half, 1/4 – 1/2 cup
  • Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper

*Use any combination of vegetables you have on hand. I’ve used asparagus and bell peppers in the past.

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350.

On large sheet pans toss vegetables with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast for 20-30 minutes. The tender vegetables may take a shorter amount of time so keep your eye on them. Remove from oven and set aside.

Preheat large soup pot over medium heat. Add 1 tsp. olive oil and bacon and cook until bacon is brown and crispy. Remove bacon to drain on paper towel and set aside.
Add onion to pot and saute until translucent.

While onion is sauteing, puree 1/2 of the roasted vegetables in a food processor until very fine. Add to onion mixture. Pulse the remaining vegetables in the food processor into larger chunks. Add to the pot with the roasted garlic. Add tomato paste, crushed red pepper, salt and black pepper to the vegetable mix and cook until tomato paste is brown. Add chicken stock, bay leaves and thyme and stir to combine.

Cook for 20 minutes** on low heat. Add the half and half and cook for an additional 10 minutes.

Serve with parmesan toast on top of soup.

** This can be cooked up to an hour‚ but more stock may need to be added.

Turkey Soup with Chive & Herb Dumplings

This Thanksgiving was a very special one. I was finally able to do what I’ve been thinking about for years – spending Thanksgiving with my best friend and fellow foodie Jen in upstate New York. Every year we spend countless hours on the phone helping plan the others Thanksgiving meals. This was the year we were able to plan OUR feast. It was fabulous and we were both thankful to spend it together.

Did I mention it’s COLD up here. My girl Jen was super smart when she threw the turkey carcass in a stock pot on Thanksgiving night and made some seriously rich stock.

This soup is dead simple to make and the chive and herb dumplings thicken it slightly and make this soup very special.

Eat up turkey.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 carrots, cut into 1/4 inch pieces
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups leftover turkey meat
  • Salt & Pepper
  • 6-8 cups homemade Turkey stock (or chicken)

Dumplings:

  • 2 cups Bisquick
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped herbs (sage, parsley & green onions)
  • 2 tablespoons cold butter

DIRECTIONS

To make the turkey stock: In a large stock pot throw in your turkey carcass and vegetables from roasting pan. Add a bay leaf and cover with water. Simmer for at least 1 hour. Let cool and skim off top layer. Strain solids and turkey from the pot and reserve clear broth.

In a soup pot, saute onions until translucent. Add carrots & garlic and season with salt and pepper. Add turkey meat and pour the turkey stock over the meat and vegetables.

Simmer the soup for 30 minutes.

For the dumplings, mix all ingredients in a bowl. Drop small spoonfuls into the soup and cook for 15 minutes uncovered. Cover the pot and cook for an additional 10 minutes.

Golden Chicken, Corn, and Noodle Soup with Saffron

I made this for a friend and I must agree with his statement. It’s really that good.

The fresh sweet corn takes this soup to another level entirely… but you must follow the process and “milk” your corn. Take the back of a knife and scrape out all of the juice and bits from the cob. The corn milk is sweet and adds a ton of flavor.

The flavors are fairly simple so a great quality chicken stock is the best. I had the time so I made homemade chicken stock but if you don’t have time then I suggest Kitchen Basics chicken stock (the VERY best store-bought stock).

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 2 large ribs celery, finely diced
  • 3 medium carrots, cut in half and into 1/4 inch pieces
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 pinch saffron threads
  • 1/2 tsp. dried thyme
  • 2 qt. homemade or low-salt chicken broth
  • 3 cups shredded cooked chicken (I use baked chicken breasts)
  • 1/2 pound Ditalini or any small pasta, cooked al dente
  • 4 ears fresh corn, kernels removed and cobs “milked”
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 3 Tbs. fresh lemon juice; more to taste
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

Tip: The pasta is cooked separately to keep the starch from the pasta from clouding the soup broth, and the pasta would also suck up too much of the soup broth as it cooked. Boiling the pasta separately solves both of these problems.

To prepare the corn: Cut the kernels from the cob. Take the back of your knife and run the knife down the cob, scraping all the juice and bits out of the corn.

Bring a medium saucepan of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add the celery, onion, carrot, garlic, saffron, and thyme. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables start to soften, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the broth and corn and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 15-20 minutes until corn is cooked through and vegetables are tender.

While the soup simmers, cook the pasta in the boiling salted water until al dente, 7-8 minutes. Drain.

Add the drained pasta, chicken and parsley to the soup and cook for about 5 minutes until chicken is warmed through. Stir in the lemon juice and season to taste with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice, if needed.

Braised Short Ribs with Coriander and Balsamic

The Feb/March issue of Fine Cooking featured an exceptional build your own Short Ribs recipe. I appreciated the explanation of the method and the ability to change any ingredient and make it mine. I chose to use 2 of my favorite ingredients – coriander and balsamic vinegar – and they made me proud once again.

I am itching to make a new version with an Asian flair. Though I am certainly ready for Spring, I could handle a few more weeks of winter weather to reinvent this sick to your ribs meal.

Lots of crusty bread should be parked beside your bowl… dip away!

INGREDIENTS

  • 4-1/2 to 5 lb. English-style beef short ribs (8 to 12 ribs)
  • 3 Tbs. vegetable oil
  • Kosher salt
  • ground black pepper
  • 3 carrots, medium-diced
  • 2 stalks celery, medium-diced
  • 1 medium onion, medium-diced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 whole dried bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoons paprika (smoked)
  • 1 tablespoons finely chopped garlic
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1/4 cup lower-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 1/2 cups dry red wine
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

DIRECTIONS

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F. In an 8-quart Dutch oven, heat 2 Tbs. of the oil over medium heat. Season the ribs with 2 tsp. salt and 1 tsp. pepper. Add half of the ribs to the pot (or as many as will fit without overlap), and cook, turning with tongs, until nicely browned on all sides, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the ribs to a platter and repeat with the remaining ribs. Pour off all but a thin layer of fat from the pan.

Add the remaining 1 Tbs. oil, carrots, celery, and onions to the pan. Season with 1/2 tsp. salt. Cook, stirring and scraping up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan, until the aromatics are soft and lightly browned, 6 to 8 minutes. Add tomato paste, bay leaves, thyme, coriander, paprika, and garlic, and cook, stirring, until well distributed and fragrant, about 1 minute.

Pour the 1/2 cup red wine into the pot and cook, stirring to scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pot, until the liquid is reduced to about 2 Tbs., about 1 minute.

Transfer all the ribs (and any juices that have accumulated) back into the pot. Pour the soy sauce, 2 cups red wine, and beef broth and 1 cup water over the ribs and using tongs, arrange the ribs as evenly as possible and no more than two layers deep.

Bring the liquid to a simmer, cover, and put the pot in the oven. Cook, turning the ribs with tongs about every 40 minutes, until they are fork tender, about 2-3/4 hours. (The meat may fall off most of the bones about midway through cooking; this does not mean that the ribs are fully tender.)

Transfer the ribs to a serving platter or dish. Let the sauce and solids sit in the pot for a few minutes to cool and with a shallow spoon, skim off as much of the fat as possible from the surface. Season the sauce to taste with salt and pepper, and add the vinegar.

Serve the ribs with the sauce spooned over, sprinkled with chopped parsley.